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FAQs

There are French terms that I don’t understand. Would that be a problem?

Not at all! That’s what we are here for. We are a team of bilingual English and French speakers which means you won’t need to carry your French-English dictionary around. Of course, it would be useful to know a bit of French! Click on the link below

Real Estate Glossary PDF

 

Can the documents be in English?

No, it is illegal to draft real estate contracts and agreements a in foreign language. Hiring an attorney or a sworn translator to provide translated documents might be an option but at additional cost, and you’ll still have to sign the original documents.

Paris Living works with a team of English speaking notaries (notaires in French), therefore so that we can all review the contracts at the time of signing. Paris Living will accompany you at the time of the signing to ensure you understand fully your rights, conditions, and obligations at the signing. 

 

Can I purchase property in France as a foreigner?

Indeed you can! There are no restrictions for foreign buyers purchasing property in France. With Paris Living, we give you the peace of mind and we guide you on each step of your property acquisition project.  

 

Is it possible to get a loan to purchase a property in France from a French bank?

Yes. Most French banks provide several financial plans and loans for a property acquisition project to foreigners and non-French residents. You must open a bank account in order to process the loan because the monthly deduction will be taken automatically from this account.

Be advised, takes approximately 3 to 4 weeks for your loan proposal to be approved, once the bank has all of the documents necessary.

 

What does preliminary due diligence look like?

Preliminary due diligence issued by Paris Living looks like this:

Sample of Preliminary Due Diligence

 

How much is the notary fee?

The notary fee is between 6% – 7% of the purchase price, it all depends on the price of the property, which includes 5.5% tax of the purchase, verifying legal documents, matters relating to the purchase, and the fees to the notary. 

In France, it is obligatory to use a notary service for buying and selling properties. Paris Living works with a team of English speaking notaries.

Simulate my notary fee

 

What is taxe foncière and what is the rate?

Taxe Foncière, also known as the French property ownership tax, is an annual tax imposed on property owners, whether or not the owner is occupying the property or renting it out. It is levied for the year of which it is imposed, and payable by the owner of the property on the 1st of January of that year.

The fundamental of Taxe Foncière calculation is almost similar with the Tax d’habitation, only in a simpler manner.

The avis d’imposition tax foncière (tax demand) is issued during the third quarter of the year (September) with a specified due date for payment, October for a primary residence and November for a secondary residence. Unless you have chosen beforehand to pay direct debit (prélèvement) on a monthly or annual basis.

The rate varies between primary residence versus secondary residence. For primary residence, the percentage is somewhere between 0.1% – 0.2%, and 1.2% – 1.7% for secondary residence. The rate depends on the rateable value of the property, size, and location.

 

What is taxe d’habitation?

Taxe d’habitation, also known as residence tax, is an annual tax imposed on the property occupier, whether it is the owner or the tenant. It is payable by the occupier of the property on the 1st of January of each year.

For a secondary residence, although the owner may not be residing physically on the 1st of January, the tax is still payable to the owner, provided the property is capable of occupation. The length of time an owner occupies their secondary residence does not define their liability for the taxe d’habitation, if they have the right of occupation of the furnished and habitable property. An exemption is made for secondary home owners who let out their property as a furnished rental (e.g. student housing, academic year), they may be exempted from the tax, however, after the taxe d’habitation exemption, they are now liable for business rates. The tax is payable by the tenant if the property is rented on an annual basis.

 

 

What is wealth tax and capital gain? How to calculate them?

For information about wealth tax and capital gain tax allowance, click on the link below

Wealth tax & capital gain tax percentage

 

Am I entitled to French residency visa if I own property in France?

Owning property in France does not necessarily entitle you to any claim of official residency. Because obtaining legal residency is a completely different process, we advise consulting an attorney.

The first visa would be a titre de séjour (which allows you to live and work but not vote) the duration of which would vary depending on your situation.

Another path to getting a visa is being sponsored by an employer.

As for the property, there are no restrictions on use per se, except as dictated by a building’s by-laws in the case of an apartment. If you didn’t have a long-term visa, you’d have to leave the Schengen area every three months to renew your tourist visa.

 

How can I generate revenue from my apartment? Is it difficult to do Airbnb in Paris?

With the new introduction of laws, regulations, and taxes for Airbnb and other short-term rentals platforms in France, doing Airbnb or short-term rentals is indeed more complicated than it used to be, especially in Paris. However, there are other alternatives for homeowners who do not reside in the owned property to still generate revenue. For more information, click on the link below

Airbnb Rules, Reguations and Alternatives

 

Can you help me sell my apartment?

Yes. For more information about using our service to sell your apartment, click here

 

Does Paris Living do rentals?

Paris Living does not do rentals. We suggest you look for a relocation agency.

 

Do you have any more questions?

Questions that are not listed on this page?

Don’t hesitate to contact us